Health Effects of Tea and its Catechins

Cover of: Health Effects of Tea and its Catechins |

Published by Springer .

Written in English

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Subjects:

  • Medical,
  • Medical / Nursing,
  • Pharmacology,
  • Medical / Nutrition,
  • Science / Microbiology,
  • General,
  • Catechin,
  • Health aspects,
  • Tea,
  • Therapeutic use

Edition Notes

Book details

ContributionsYukiaki Kuroda (Editor), Yukihiko Hara (Editor)
The Physical Object
FormatHardcover
Number of Pages118
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL10325110M
ISBN 10030648207X
ISBN 109780306482076

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During the course of the last two decades, the health effects of tea and its catechins have been docmnented in nmnerous scientific studies and the scientific basis of these effects 5/5(1).

About this book. During the course of the last two decades, the health effects of tea and its catechins have been docmnented in nmnerous scientific studies and the scientific basis of these effects has been elaborated. Professor Kuroda and Dr. Hara provide in this volmne a translation of a thorough and extensive book published earlier (in Japanese), which will be of.

Introduction. During the course of the last two decades, the health effects of tea and its catechins have been docmnented in nmnerous scientific studies and the scientific basis of these effects has been elaborated. Professor Kuroda and Dr. Hara provide in this volmne a translation of a thorough and extensive book published earlier (in Japanese), which will be of.

Health Effects of Tea and Its Catechins. During the course of the last two decades, the Health Effects of Tea and its Catechins book effects of tea and its catechins have been docmnented in nmnerous scientific studies and the scientific basis of these effects has been elaborated.

Professor Kuroda and Dr. Hara provide in this volmne a translation of a thorough and extensive book published. During the course of the last two decades, the health effects of tea and its catechins have been docmnented in nmnerous scientific studies and the scientific basis of these effects Brand: Springer US.

Health effects of tea and its catechins. [Yukiaki Kuroda; Yukihiko Hara] -- This text is a comprehensive overview of the historical use of green tea and a description of its beneficial effects against certain diseases such as cancer, hypertension, diabetes, obesity, Your Web browser is not enabled for JavaScript.

Ham has published nmnerous research papers on the health effects of green tea and its catechins. This book provides a comprehensive overview of the historical use of green tea in Japan and elsewhere, followed by a description of the many disease conditions against which these teas have preventive (protective) effects.

Health Effects of Tea and Its Catechins It supplies varying quantities of micronutrients, such as manganese and potassium to the human diet, as well as contributing to fluid intake. Tea is also an excellent source of polyphenols and contributes significantly to our consumption of these bioactive compounds.

Tea in Health and Disease Prevention. Book • Edited by: Victor R. Preedy. Browse book content. Biological Effects of Green Tea Catechins in Ocular Tissue Cells.

Book chapter Full text Clearly there are still questions about the efficacy and use of tea for health benefit. This book presents a comprehensive look at the compounds. Long-term feeding of tea catechins could be beneficial for the suppression of high-fat diet-induced obesity by modulating lipid metabolism, could have a beneficial effect against lipid and glucose metabolism disorders implicated in type 2 diabetes, and could also reduce the risk of coronary by: The main health-promoting substances in tea are polyphenols, in particular catechins and epicatechins.

Lab and animal studies say these molecules have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Harvard-led studies of large groups of people over time have found that tea or coffee drinkers are at lower risk for diabetes and possibly cardiovascular disease.

Several epidemiological studies have shown the beneficial effects of tea and its catechins on obesity [5,6,7,8]. For example, an early study in The Netherlands showed that high dietary intake of flavones, flavonols, and catechins was inversely associated with body mass index (BMI) in women [ 10 ].Cited by: Green tea reportedly possesses many health beneficial effects as a beverage.

Its usage has even been elevated to therapeutic level for treatment of diseases, including cancer, after increasing the catechin constituents in green tea extract or through purified catechins by: 2.

This book provides evidence to support the health-promoting components of green tea for human health. Consisting of 27 chapters, it explores the significance of green tea and its catechins represented by epigallocatechin gallate, demonstrating their beneficial effects on diseases including cancer, obesity, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular diseases, cerebrovascular.

Tea is one of the most popular drinks due to its pleasant taste and perceived health effects. Although health benefits have been attributed to tea consumption since the beginning of its history, scientific investigation of this beverage and its constituents has been under way for about 30 years (McKay and Blumberg ; Gardner, Ruxton, and Leeds ).Cited by: Cite this chapter as: Kuroda Y., Hara Y.

() Food and Industrial Applications of Tea Catechins. In: Health Effects of Tea and Its : Yukiaki Kuroda, Yukihiko Hara. Tea is rich in polyphenolic catechins which are beneficial to health. There have been evidences suggesting that habitual tea consumption may reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD).

Intake of tea or catechins isolated from tea was shown to inhibit the development of CVD in population studies and in animal models. Many possible pathways and mechanisms were Cited by: 4.

Description This book provides evidence to support the health-promoting components of green tea for human health. Consisting of 27 chapters, it explores the significance of green tea and its catechins represented by epigallocatechin gallate, demonstrating their beneficial effects on diseases including cancer, obesity, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular diseases.

The past decade has seen considerable interest and progress in unraveling the beneficial health effects of tea, particularly its polyphenolic components and its antioxidant activity. Understanding the science behind the claims will help in the production and marketing of teas and tea products.

A review published in Food and Bioproducts Processing in found a high catechin content in Darjeeling tea, as well as teas infused with black currant, cherry, orange, lemon or strawberry. Adding sugar or cream to your brewed tea, however, may detract from its overall health benefits by upping your daily calorie count.

(EGCG), which has the highest biological activity among green tea catechins (GTCs). Figure 1. Chemical structures of (+)-catechin and major green tea catechins.

Epidemiological Studies Several epidemiological studies have shown the beneficial effects of tea and its catechins Cited by:   History of Tea. The book The Story of Tea: A Cultural History and Drinking Guide mentions the prevalence of tea in areas like Assam (India), Yunnan (China), Myanmar, Vietnam, Thailand, and Laos during BC.

It is believed that the Chinese were the first to use it as a beverage and discover its medicinal values. They considered it a tonic that could stop aging. Although health benefits have been assumed throughout the history of using Camellia sinensis as a common beverage, there is no high-quality evidence that tea confers significant benefits.

In clinical research over the early 21st century, tea has been studied extensively for its potential to lower the risk of human diseases, but none of this research is conclusive as of   Studies indicate that the catechins in green tea can inhibit the growth of oral bacteria in the lab, but no evidence shows that drinking green tea has similar effects.

Tea prepared using leaf of Camellia sinensis is one of the most popular beverages worldwide and its habitual consumption has been associated with health benefits.

The health beneficial effects of tea are attributed to its polyphenolic catechins [1]. Tea is classified as non-fermented green tea, semi-fermented oolong tea and fullyfermented black Cited by: 4. Health Benefits of Tea: Green, Black, and White Tea Tea is a name given to a lot of brews, but purists consider only green tea, black tea, white tea, oolong tea, and pu-erh tea the real thing.

Tea leaf (Camellia sinensis) is rich in catechins, which endow tea with various health benefits. There are more than ten catechin compounds in tea, among which epigallocatechingallate (EGCG) is the most abundant.

Epidemiological studies on the association between tea consumption and the risk of breast cancer were summarized, and the inhibitory effects of tea catechins Cited by: Interestingly, the beneficial effects of tea catechins are not limited only to its antioxidant activity.

These bioactive compounds have beneficial effect on weight loss and reduction of circulating lipid derivatives. These effects were suggested to be a result from its ability to increase fat oxidation (Sharangi, ; Kao et al., ). The benefits of green tea catechins on lipid oxidation and related fat-burning pathways are achieved in a dose dependent manner.

Significant effects in humans are noted only at high doses, such as mg EGCG equivalent per day (most Green Tea Extract supplements are roughly 50% EGCG). Fat burning effects are highly synergistic, almost.

Flavonoids in tea, called catechins, are thought to be responsible for its beneficial effects on the heart. The study found that a group of proteins in. Extensive studies by Dr. Babu’s group of the effects of green tea and its catechins in animal models of type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

53,61,62,73 have shown that green tea helps optimize glucose utilization, thereby reducing blood glucose levels. The health benefits of green tea for a wide variety of ailments, including different types of cancer, heart disease, and liver disease, were reported. Many of these beneficial effects of green tea are related to its catechin, particularly (-)-epigallocatechingallate, content.

There is evidence from in vitro and animal studies on the underlying mechanisms of green tea catechins. Green tea is becoming an increasingly popular beverage to have, especially for those people who are more health-conscious. It’s already one of the most popular drinks in the world, especially in parts of Asia, while the west is only just catching up in the last few years to the delicate tastes and health benefits from drinking green tea.

Green Tea Science Part 1: Polyphenols, Catechins and EGCG - 15 Commonly Asked Questions and How You Can Benefit. Ap Although the popularity of green tea in the Western world is a fairly recent phenomenon, the highly beneficial nutritional value has enjoyed a favorable reputation throughout many parts of Asia for thousands of years.

The green tea catechin (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) has attracted significant research interest due to its beneficial therapeutic effects, which include anti. The phenolic content in tea refers to the phenols and polyphenols, natural plant compounds which are found in chemical compounds affect the flavor and mouthfeel of tea.

Polyphenols in tea include catechins, theaflavins, tannins, and flavonoids. Polyphenols found in green tea include, but are not limited to, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), epigallocatechin, epicatechin. Among the many known health benefits of tea catechins count anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective activities, as well as effects on the regulation of food intake.

Here we address cannabimimetic bioactivity of catechin derivatives occurring in tea leaves as a possible cellular effector of these functionalities.

The health benefits associated with tea consumption have resulted in the wide inclusion of green tea extracts in botanical dietary supplements, which are widely consumed as adjuvants for complementary and alternative medicines.

Tea contains polyphenols such as catechins or flavanols including epicatechin, epigallocatechin, epicatechin gallate, and epigallocatechin gallate Cited by:   Health Benefits Of Tea: Milking It Or Not: The Salt In many cultures, milk and tea are natural pairs, while in others, not so much.

But if you're drinking tea for health. The most abundant catechin in green tea is epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), accounting for as much as 65% of all green tea catechins. Thousands of published studies describe the benefits of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). Scientists have identified other green tea catechins that also contribute to its long list of health benefits.

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